About Us

The Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative Phase 2 (NURHI 2) is the second phase of a ground-breaking 10-year family planning project in Nigeria funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and a private philanthropist. From 2015 to 2020, NURHI 2 used an integrated model of advocacy, demand generation and service delivery informed by research to change the way people think about family planning; to improve accessibility to good quality family planning services; and to strengthen support for family planning among government, the media, and civil society leaders, thus increasing contraceptive use in Kaduna, Lagos and Oyo states.

Where we work

KADUNA
LAGOS
OYO


Our Vision

Our vision is a Nigeria where supply and demand barriers to contraceptive use are eliminated and family planning becomes a social norm.

Our Mission

To increase contraceptive prevalence rates in Kaduna, Lagos, and Oyo States by 12.5%.



Our Strategy

NURHI 2 drew on the NURHI 1 proven-to-work approach of integrating demand generation, service delivery and advocacy, guided by research. Like gears, demand generation and advocacy increased use of family planning services. Service delivery outlets produced satisfied users who served as advocates for family planning, further increasing demand for family planning. Research provided feedback and information to guide implementation and mid-project corrections.

Our Consortium

NURHI 2 was implemented by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) in partnership with the Association for Reproductive and Family Health (ARFH) and Center for Communication and Social Impact (CCSI).

JHUCCP

ARFH

CCSI

NURHI Phase 1 (2009 – 2015)

Phase 1 of NURHI was implemented in sex cities(Federal Capital Territory, Ibadan, Ilorin, Kaduna, Benin and Zaria).It significantly contributed to increasing the contraceptive prevalence rate in these cities as indicated by the 2013 National Demographic Health Survey.

NURHI Phase 1 (2009 – 2015)

Phase 1 of NURHI was implemented in sex cities(Federal Capital Territory, Ibadan, Ilorin, Kaduna, Benin and Zaria).It significantly contributed to increasing the contraceptive prevalence rate in these cities as indicated by the 2013 National Demographic Health Survey.